About Our Permaculture Life

Image from Salt Magazine (Spring 2015)
My name is Morag Gamble. I grew up with the ethics and practice of healthy and sustainable living. My childhood was spent in the a leafy green suburb on the outskirts of Melbourne on an island in the Gippsland Lakes area.

I discovered permaculture in my teens and it felt like a natural fit - a way to care for the earth and care for people - a way to make a positive contribution and create ripples of positivity in the world.


My work and life are totally interwoven through the connecting fabric of permaculture. I love community gardens, food coops, ecovillage living, permaculture education, school gardens, earning through a permaculture livelihood, and natural parenting and homeschooling.


I share this permaculture life with my husband, Evan, and three children, Maia (9), Hugh (7) and Monty (2).


We live in a permaculture village near Maleny in the subtropical part of southeast Queensland, Australia. We designed and built our modular eco-home - with much appreciated help from my family.


We are mortgage-free and live simply. Our income is derived from permaculture-related activities.


We grow a lot of our own vegetables, herbs and fruit in the polycultural garden-playground surrounding our home. We collect all our own water, deal with our wastewater on site. We produce most of our own power.


We love our life here. The kids love the space, the freedom, the wildlife and the friendships. They value the environmental responsible way of life. They get it!


There always more we can do, and we are always looking for ways to reduce our ecological impact and improve the educational impact we can have. We'll keep learning and sharing!






13 comments:

  1. A wonderful way to live, and to raise your children.

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  2. I visited not knowing what "permaculture" means. After several browsing minutes, I still don't. Perhaps a tab defining and briefly describing it -- unless the blog is aimed at people who already know. Good luck with it. Leslie

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    1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permaculture

      I think most people who visit this blog either already know what permaculture is, or are happy to google any terms they're not familiar with ;)

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    2. Hi Leslie,

      I think most people visiting this blog already know, or are happy to google unfamiliar terms: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permaculture
      :)

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  3. Hi Leslie, Thanks for writing and pointing out a glaringly obvious absent post. I am writing about how I weave permaculture into my life without explaining what it is. I will endeavour to add a page here soon. In gratitude, Morag

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  4. Excellent blog! Thanks for putting it out here for us all to learn. Living in the western highlands of Panama, we're still considered sub-tropical we're quite high @ over 5,000 ft altitude w/ hard rains(now) and high winds(between the rainy and dry seasons)and 5 month long dry seasons; so it can be extreme sometimes. I would hope, though, to be able to grow most of your list here eventually. Thanks for the great video tour (more close-up shots of the plants in the future would be good). Gracias! Saludos!

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    1. Thanks John! I plan to visit a lot of these plants in detail in future videos so I hope that will help. Good luck with your Panamanian gardening.

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  5. Thanks for the videos Morag, especially showing us around the veggie garden. It is great to actually see how permaculture looks. I live in Kenya and there are very few places that actually do the serious intercropping, mulching, food forests etc. I am going to start a garden tomorrow and there is a young enthusiastic Kenyan called Pilot whose first lesson will be to watch your post. Thank you!

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    1. Hi Joannah, Thanks for writing. I'm so delighted that the video is useful for you in helping to get permaculture systems going in your part of the world. Let me know if there are particular areas that you'd like more detail and perhaps I could make a film about that over the next weeks. Best wishes and happy gardening! Morag

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  6. I love your videos/posts? It is so wonderful to be shown a really productive, Permaculture garden and the way to mix the plants up together and obvious mulching. I am starting a new garden tomorrow with an enthusiastic young Kenyan (we are in Kenya) whose first lesson is going to be watching you show us all the different plants and why they are where they are etc. Many thanks.

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  7. Morag is an excellent permaculture teacher. I love her way of teaching. She is not only a teacher, she is an experienced designer, a permaculture blogger and film maker. I love her writing on the Australian Permaculture Magazine. She is doing a great job as correspondent for the new ABC Simple Living and Permaculture radio show.

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  8. Just wondering if you and your family are vegan? It seems a good fit with permaculture (lighter footprint on the earth).

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  9. Watched 2 videos today, in Ireland. It temperate here. Jealous of the fruit you can grow.
    Your description of making a bed from scratch was excellent. You're a Gifted teacher and you did it as well as explained it. Right from bare compacted earth to the final planting stage. Really helpful. Thanks. Robert in Dublin.

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