Monday, 29 August 2016

Five Easy Steps to Make Cheap Beeswax Wraps & Reduce Cling Wrap Use. Film #10 with Morag Gamble (5 mins)

In less than 5 minutes you can make your own beeswax wraps to replace plastic cling wrap. These will last you well over a year and then you can compost them!  Let's do something about the trillions of tonnes of single use plastic swilling around the oceans - contaminating earth's systems and our food system. Please share this.



Watch this 5 minute film to see how to simply and cheaply make your own natural beeswax wraps - to wrap veggies and fruit, leftover bowls, cheese, sandwiches, jar tops, bread loaves, lunchbox snacks and so much more.



Yes, it's a small step, but many small steps, and a sense of commitment to want to make a difference, is more powerful than you may think.  When you take positive steps forward, there's a ripple effect of positive change.

For the method shown in the film, all you need is to make your own beeswax wraps is:

  • a piece of natural cotton cloth (choose the size you need for your particular use - I find 20cm x 20cm is a useful bowl-top size)
  • natural beeswax (about 5-10 grams is all you need for 20cm x 20cm cloth)
  • 1/4 teaspoon coconut oil
  • flat sandwich hotplate

5 easy steps  to make beeswax cloths:

  1. Trim cloth to size (pinking shears make a nice edge - zigzag)
  2. Grate 5-10 grams beeswax
  3. Make a parcel with the wax and wrapped inside the cloth.
  4. Place parcel on hotplate and press down with sandwich press lid for 10-15 seconds. Check and do again if beeswax still unmelted.
  5. Lift off hotplate and hang on line for 1 minute (watch out - it's hot!)
That's it!  Quick and easy aren't they. I'd thought they were going to be much more fiddly than that. 




To wash - simply wipe, rinse off or use warm soapy water - not hot.

To revitalise - after a lot of use, you may wish add a little more beeswax and melt again as above. Helps to keep them sticking well.

Another method: place cloth on a tray in a warm oven. Cover with same quantity of grated beeswax and oil and allow to melt and infuse (about 5 mins in a 50 degree celsius oven). I sometimes use a paintbrush to spread wax to the edges. (You may want a separate old tray to do this on, but you can clean it OK and a little natural beeswax isn't going to hurt).

See a previous post on making beeswax cloths: 
Plastic-wrap free food - DIY beeswax cloths


ONE DAY WORKSHOP: Sept 17: DIY Permaculture Home with Morag Gamble

Come and learn in my garden with me - how to make these beeswax cloths, how to make your own laundry detergent and much more.  Enjoy a tour of my place and a delicious home cooked lunch. Take home the things you make.  BOOKINGS:  https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/permaculture-life-series-the-diy-permaculture-home-tickets-26816855938





27 comments:

  1. fantastic, thanks so much for this simple solution to cling wrap, I was just these past few days wondering what can be used instead.

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    1. You're welcome. I love making these and picking my favourite old fabrics too.

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  2. I love my beeswax wraps that I bought over a year ago. I would like to make some more for our family and to give as gifts so this video is great:) I find they really do help to reduce plastic cling-wrap use which is awesome. Meg:)

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    1. Yes, they make excellent gifts, and it's so great to have a supply of all different sizes in the kitchen.

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  3. Awesome Morag, will definitely try this , thanks for sharing.

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  4. definitely going to give this a go, thank you .

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  5. Thanks so much, I tried this in the past using just the beeswax, I will add coconut oil next time, oh and try the sandwich press :) I love the birds in the background and the garden.

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    1. I tried first without the oil and they ended up like parchment with little sticking power.

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  6. is it ok to put on hot foods in containers as well ?

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  7. The sandwich press is a great idea. Thanks. These wraps are great.

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  8. Love it and can't wait to do it. I don't have a sandwich maker, so do you have any tips on doing it in the oven?

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    1. Hi Veronica, yes you can use the oven. I've a few tips about that written at the bottom of the post and in the linked post. Happy making!

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  9. absolutely brilliant!! cant wait to try this out - thank you

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    1. Great - have fun with it. My kids and I love making them.

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  10. Wonderful thank you for sharing. Can I ask where you buy your beeswax? I'm just at glass house

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    1. Hi Erin,
      I usually get mine at either Maple Street Coop, through local beekeepers and sometimes when I'm at Northey Street City Farm Organic markets I get it there. You could ask a local beekeeper/beekeeping group and check any local farmers markets around you. Good luck.
      Morag

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  11. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  12. Thank you! I have bought some of these in the past, but they're expensive! I already have the ingredients, something to add to my to-do list :-)

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  13. Thanks Morag I just made my first batch of bees wax wraps!!!! Was a bit messy to make but im so proud of myself!! You are amazing Morag and such an inspiration so THANK YOU!!

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  14. What size do you recommend for snacks, sandwiches and lunches? Thanks :)

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    1. A good size is somewhere around 25-30cm square. Maybe do a trial wrap with a piece of cloth to measure what is best for your type/size of bread.

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  15. Mine wrap is not clingy. Any suggestions?

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    1. There could be a few things happening:
      - not enough wax - I use 5-10gms for 20cm square
      - too much oil - for the size above I use 1/4 tsp
      - fabric too thick (or thin) - I use a dense but fine cotton - a little like a cotton sarong
      - leave your hands on for a few seconds when wrapping - it is the warmth of your hand that melts and seals the wrap around the jar
      - you can add some resin which makes it more tacky like cling wrap - I've not used this because I find they are sealing well without, but most commercial brands of beeswax wraps do.
      I hope this helps

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