Thursday, 24 December 2015

Double your vegetable production immediately


We can immediately double the amount of food we produce in our gardens simply by changing our perception.

There is so much more food in the garden that first meets the eye. Many edible parts of plants are completely overlooked.

Here are a few examples:

  • carrot tops are edible - delicious in a salad or as a stir-fry green
  • beetroot tops actually have more nutritional value than the root
  • pumpkin leaves are lovely steamed - the perfect gluten-free low-carb wrap - also the skin, the seeds, the young shoots and the flowers
  • sweet potato shoots are edible
  • broccoli and cauliflower leaves are edible as a cabbage/kale alternative
  • bean leaves are edible
  • young leaves of cucumber
  • celery leaves
  • young onion leaves
  • flowers of brassicas

abundant carrot tops


delicious and nutrient-dense beetroot tops - great in salads and stir fries 

15 comments:

  1. Good morning Morag. Those vegetables look delicious. Happy Christmas to you and the family. xx

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    1. Thank you Rhonda - Merry Christmas to you and your family too.

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  2. Hi Morag!
    Nice to meet you and your blog through Rhonda from "Down to earth".
    I´ll be following you.

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    1. Welcome Ale - I'll look forward to your comments. Happy Christmas and best wishes for 2016.

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  3. Dear Morag,

    I've just read every single post on your blog and I must tell you how much I've enjoyed reading about your life and your work. Rhonda mentioned your name to me a few weeks back and I'm so glad I took the time to thoroughly read your blog - I love it and am so inspired by your posts.

    I took a PDC a few years ago and have been on a quest to learn through experimenting on our own property (in a cold climate). I've made lots of mistakes but have also experienced some tremendous successes (both have taught me a great deal). I have MUCH more to learn though and am keen to sink deeper into my understanding of permaculture. I find it truly incredible how I travel through layers of understanding and how more is revealed over time (through my own experiences but also through MUCH more careful observation).

    I look forward to reading more about your life's work - thank you for sharing your knowledge and experience :)



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    1. Hello Sherri,
      Thanks for your note and welcome to my blog.
      I really like your perspective about experimenting and learning. I think when we stay in the frame of mind that we always have lots to learn we are open to the lessons we gain from observing how our system is evolving. I am constantly learning and excitedly ask questions of all new gardens and villages I visit.
      I look forward to your comments.
      Happy Christmas and best wishes for 2016
      Morag

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  4. Hello Morag!
    Visiting your blog via Rhonda..... I have a few days off over Christmas and look forward to reading about your lifestyle. Developing a deeper understanding of permaculture is on my 'to do' list for 2016.
    Best wishes from Essex, UK

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    1. Merry Christmas from the antipodes! Thanks for visiting. I hope you enjoy this holiday reading.

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  5. Hi Morag, I am loving the look of your blog and I'll be reading regularly. I hope you and your family have a lovely Christmas.

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  6. Hello Rose,
    Welcome and thank you for your feedback.
    Merry Christmas.
    Morag

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  7. Hi! I just discovered your blog on Down to Earth and I love it! My husband and I live on a 100+ acre farm in the mountains of western North Carolina, USA and we have been steadily striving for more self - sustainability. Blogs like yours certainly inspire me to do more! I wish you and your family the best for 2016.

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    1. Hello Rose, Thanks for writing! It's so lovely to hear from you - knowing that there are people all around the world striving to be more sustainable gives me so much hope for a positive future. Best wishes for 2016. Morag

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  8. Thanks for the great info on using produce in less traditional ways.
    I just found out today that I have been eating beetroot tops without realising it. They are growing in amongst the chard and I didn't really look at what I was picking. Now I'm trying to decide if I should harvest the bulbs or just enjoy the leaves for a little longer, they were so lovely in my quiche!

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    1. Yes, I love how colourful the leaves and stems of beetroot are - they really lift a bowl of salad, or stir fry too.

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  9. This is wonderful information, thank you!

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